Join a Wildlife Association to Learn about Wildlife in your State


If you want to learn more about the wildlife in your state, whether it’s for deer hunting or for bird watching – odds are there’s a wildlife association in your neck of the woods that could be just right for you. These groups can be a valuable source for information, camaraderie and a way to support efforts promoting conservation, habitat protection and good recreational practices.

As an example, the Minnesota Deer Hunters Association (MDHA) offers everything from camps for teaching young hunters about safety and best practices, to offering seeds for food plots at reduced rates, to having local and statewide meetings in which hunters share information.

Image result for Minnesota Deer Hunters Association LogoThere’s another bonus in joining groups like the MDHA: It’s a good way to support conservation and quality outdoor recreational areas. The MDHA and its partners have helped over $39 million worth of conservation and habitat projects around Minnesota, supporting such efforts as increasing moose habitat, protecting forest lands and restoring habitat corridors.

“Wildlife associations play an important part in protecting our forests, representing interests of hunters, fishermen and other recreational groups, and promoting conservation,” said Ed Patrias, a Minnesota Real Estate Manager for Potlatch. “The MDHA is one of many examples of groups that make a difference while providing value for their members. We’ve been actively involved in the organization from local chapters to the charter organization.”

In Minnesota, there is a wide array of organizations offering information and advocacy for people who are following their recreational passions. For birders, there’s the Minnesota Ornithologists’ Union. For snowmobilers, there are groups like the Minnesota United Snowmobilers Association. And for anglers, there are groups like Let’s Go Fishing for older enthusiasts, and the Women Anglers of Minnesota.

People in other states will find a similar diversity of outdoors-related groups available to them. As some examples in the other states where Potlatch sells recreational property, there’s the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation for hunters in Idaho, the Arkansas Trail Riders Association for that state’s horsemen and horsewomen, Mississippi Bass Nation for anglers in that state, and the Alabama chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation, just to name a few.

There seems to be a group for almost any outdoor activity. So how do you find the one that’s best for your interests? While the internet is helpful on providing overviews of wildlife associations, it can sometimes be hard to tell if a group is active and vibrant from its website.

With this in mind, use a combination of online and in-person research to find the right group for you.

And it’s a good idea to talk to recreational experts in your area – people who live, work and pursue recreational activities nearby.

One such source would be an expert in the Potlatch Preferred Broker Network. Not only do they know about selling properties, they are well-versed in matching buyers’ real estate and recreational needs.

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